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New Mexico Commission of Public Records - State Records Center and Archives

Frequently Asked Questions

Where are you located?
What are your hours?
What are your fees?

Questions Regarding the State Archives
Questions Regarding Records Management
Questions Regarding Administrative Law


Where are you located?
The main facility is at 1209 Camino Carlos Rey in Santa Fe. A branch Records Warehouse is located at 4320 Yale Blvd. NE Suite A in Albuquerque. More Information

What are your hours?
The agency is open Monday through Friday (except holidays) from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Records Warehouse - 8:00 AM to 12:00 Noon and 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM.
Archivist Reference Assistance - 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM.
*Documents may be requested in advance for availability between 9:00 AM to 4:00 p.m.
Archives Research Room 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM.
Administrative Law 10:00 AM to 12:00 Noon and 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM. On the day previous to and the day of the rule-filing deadline, the Division opens at 8:00 a.m.

General Staff Meetings are periodically held during the morning from 8:00 AM to 9:00 AM. During those meetings, the agency is closed.

What are your fees?

Agency fees are established in rule at 1.13.2 NMAC


Questions Regarding the State Archives

I need to archive my records. What do I do?
Where can I get a copy of my divorce?
Do you have birth and death certificates?
Do you have marriage records?
Do you have Catholic church records?
Do you have Protestant church records?
Do you have maps?
Do you have building plan or architecture drawings?
Do you have court records?
Do you have census records?
Do you have deeds, probate or guardianship records?
Are your collections available on microfilm?
Do you have a guide book available for sale?
Do you participate in inter-library loan?
Do you conduct extensive genealogy research?
Do you have a film and photograph collection?


ARCHIVES

I need to archive my records. What do I do?

Only "permanent records" are accessioned into the State's archives. You are most likely referring to the off-site storage of your inactive (no longer being actively accessed) records. This involves boxing, labeling and transporting your records to either the Santa Fe or Albuquerque Records Center. The procedures for storing records , in any media, in the Records Center can be found in 1.13.20 NMAC, Storage of Public Records .

Where can I get a copy of my divorce?

When you filed for divorce you did so in District Court. Your divorce was granted (divorce was decreed) through District Court. What you are asking for is a copy of your divorce decree. You can obtain a copy of your decree from the district court in which it was filed. Divorce decrees prior to 1912 are contained in the Judicial Records collection in the archives. Divorce decrees after 1912 are available from the district court in which it was filed.

Do you have birth and death certificates?

No. If you require a birth or death certificate, please contact the Bureau of Vital Statistics at 1105 South St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM, 87501, Phone: (505)-827-2338 or 1111 Stanford NE, in Albuquerque, NM, phone: (505) 841-4185. State statute requires a moratorium of 100 years on Birth Registers and a 50 year moratorium on death registers. No Civil birth or death registers are available prior to 1907. Resources, other than civil records, are available for documenting births, marriages or deaths include church records of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. These records are available on microfilm through the New Mexico State Records Center and Archives and also from the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Do you have marriage records?

No. Marriage records are maintained by County Clerks and are available through the County Clerk's office of the county in which the marriage took place. No civil marriage registers are available prior to 1863, however civil marriages may be recorded in: County Justice of the Peace Records or Probate Journals. Marriages prior to 1863 may also be documented through Catholic Church records.

Do you have Catholic church records?

Yes. Sacramental records of baptism, marriage and burial for the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and Diocese of Gallup are available on microfilm. Originals are located at the Archdiocese of Santa Fe Office of Historic Artistic Patrimony, 223 Cathedral Place, Santa Fe, NM, 87501 and Diocese of Gallup office, 711 South Puerco, Gallup, NM, 87301. Records for the Diocese of Las Cruces may be viewed by contacting the respective Dioceses.

Do you have Protestant church records?

No.

Do you have maps?

Yes. The following types of maps are held in the archives. Exploration 1700-1870, no originals available Railroad 1900-1930 Road Maps 1900- present In addition to maps in the archives, the following sources are also available. Plat - Available through individual County Assessor and County Clerk Offices Right-of-Way - Available through the State Highway and Transportation Department.

Do you have building plan or architecture drawings?

No. Contact the following departments for: Construction plans/drawings- Construction Industries, Phone (505) 827-7030 State Buildings - Property Control, General Services Department, Phone (505) 827-2141 Historic Buildings - State Historic Preservation Office, Phone (505) 827-6320

Do you have court records?

Yes. The following court records are available in the archives. District Court Civil and Criminal Case files and Docket books prior to 1912; District Court records, 1912 to the present, are available at the District Courts. NM Supreme Court 1850-1912

Do you have census records?

Yes. The following census records are available. Spanish Period (1790- 1821) available in the microfilm edition of Spanish Archives of New Mexico Mexican Period (1821-1846) available in the microfilm edition of the Mexican Archives of New Mexico Territorial Period (1885-1912) available in the microfilm edition of the Territorial Archives of New Mexico US Federal (1850-1920, except 1890 which was destroyed by fire) available in microfilm.

Do you have deeds, probate or guardianship records?

Yes. County records from 1850 to 1900 are available but incomplete. For records after 1900 contact individual county clerks.

Are your collections available on microfilm?

Microfilm edition of the Land Records of New Mexico, also known as SANM I, 65 rolls. Spanish Archives of New Mexico (SANM II), 1621-1821, 23 rolls. Mexican Archives of New Mexico (MANM), 1821-1846, 43 rolls. Territorial Archives of New Mexico, 1846-1912, 189 rolls. Microfilmed collections and related indexes may be purchased. For microfilm purchases contact the Micrographics Bureau of the Records Management Division with this agency. To purchase the related index contact the Archives and Historical Services Division.

Do you have a guide book to the New Mexico Archives available for sale?

Not at this time.

Do you participate in interlibrary loan?

No.

Do you conduct extensive genealogy research?

Archivists will provide minimal research assistance. Researchers must provide specific information, including names, approximate dates and locations. Archival staff will spend up to 30 minutes on a research request. ALLOW 2 TO 3 WEEKS FOR RESPONSE.

Send request to:
Archives and Historical Services Division
State Records Center and Archives
1205 Camino Carlos Rey
Santa Fe, NM 87505
Fax: (505) 476-7909 e-mail: archives@state.nm.us

 

Do you have a film and photograph collection?

Yes. Films and requests for over 10 photographs may be viewed by appointment only


Questions Regarding Records Management

What kind of records do you store in the records center?
Can anyone look at these records?
Are you the custodian of those records?
How can one get information out of these records?
What kind of information/records are created and or maintained by state agencies?
What is a retention schedule?
When are an agency's records eligible for destruction?
How does an agency destroy its records?
What are the approved methods of destruction?
What is the difference between Public Record and Non-record?
What is micrographics?
Are there standards for electronic imaging?
If a record is imaged can the original paper version be destroyed?


RECORDS MANAGEMENT

What kind of records are store d in the records center?

Agencies may store inactive records with the Records Centers.

Can anyone look at these records?

No. Although many are public records, the State Records Center and Archives is not the legal custodian of these records and cannot allow anyone to look at the records. The public can, however, look at the storage tickets.

Are you the custodian of those records?

No. The originating agency retains legal custody of the records until their final disposition through destruction or transfer to the Archives and Historical Services Division (State Records Center and Archives).

How can one get information out of these records?

Contact the Record Custodian at the custodial agency and request authorization for access to the records.

What kind of information/records are created and or maintained by state agencies?

A description of agency specific records (records unique to the agency) can be found in that agency's records retention and disposition schedule. Records that all agencies are likely to create can be found in general schedules. Model schedules have also been developed for many county and municipal functions.

What is a retention and disposition schedule?

Records retention and disposition schedule” means rules adopted by the commission pursuant to Section 14-3-6 NMSA 1978 describing records of an agency, establishing a timetable for their life cycle and providing authorization for their disposition. Records common to all state agencies are scheduled in general schedules for administrative records 1.15.2 NMAC, General Administrative Records Retention and Disposition Schedule , financial records vouchered through the Dept of Finance and Administration 1.15.4 NMAC, General Financial Records Retention and Disposition Schedule and financial records for agencies that do not voucher through the Dept of Finance and Administration 1.15.5 NMAC, Interpretative General Financial Records Retention and Disposition Schedule , personnel records 1.15.6 NMAC, General Personnel Records , and medical records 1.15.8 NMAC, Record Retention and Disposition Schedule for Medical Records .

When are an agency's records eligible for destruction?

An agencies records are eligible for destruction when they have met the retention contained in the agency's records retention and disposition schedule or the applicable general schedule. "Retention" means the period of time during which records must be maintained by an organization because they are needed for operational, legal, fiscal, historical or other purposes.

How does an agency destroy its records?

All public records must be held for their required retention. Destruction of these records is the responsibility of the Records Custodian and the State Records Administrator. Destruction of theses records must be approved and accomplished through an approved method of destruction. The procedures for destroying public records are found in 1.13.30 NMAC, Destruction of Public Records .

What are the approved methods of destruction?

Witnessed incineration.
Witnessed dump site burial.
Recycling through bonded recycler that will provide certificate of destruction.
Witnessed shredding.
When there are no issues of security, it is appropriate to place non-records in trash bins or waste paper baskets.

See in 1.13.30 NMAC, Destruction of Public Records .

What is the difference between Public Record and Non-record?

A record is "information preserved by any technique in any medium now known, or later developed, that can be recognized by ordinary human sensory capabilities either directly or with the aid of technology." 1.13.30 NMAC, Destruction of Public Records .

Public Records means all books, papers, maps, photographs or other documentary materials, regardless of physical form or characteristics, made or received by any agency in the pursuance of law or in connection with the transaction of public business and preserved, or appropriate for preservation, by the agency or its legitimate successor as evidence of the organization, functions, policies, decisions, procedures, operations or other activities of the government or because of the informational and historical value of data contained therein. (14-3-2 NMSA 1978) “Non-record” means extra copies of documents kept solely for convenience of reference, stocks of publications, records not usually included within the scope of the official records of an agency or government entity, and library material intended only for reference or exhibition. The following specific types of materials are non-records: materials neither made nor received in pursuance of statutory requirements nor in connection with the functional responsibility of the officer or agency; extra copies of correspondence; preliminary drafts; blank forms, transmittal letters or forms that do not add information; sample letters; and reading file or informational files.

What is micrographics?

The technology by which information can be quickly reduced to a microform, stored conveniently and then easily retrieved for reference and use.

What is a microform?

The collective term for all micro images such as, film, fiche aperture card, jacket, roll, or strip.

What is microfilm?

A photographic reproduction of a document greatly reduced in size from the original on fine grain, high resolution film and requiring a reader for viewing.

Are there standards for electronic imaging?

Yes. There are microphotography standards which include microfilm, computer out microfilm, and electronic imaging.

See 1.14.2 NMAC, Microphotography Standards


Questions Regarding Administrative Law

What is The New Mexico Register?
How do I subscribe or access The New Mexico Register?
What is the New Mexico Administrative Code?
What are the deadlines to submit material for publication in The New Mexico Register?
Where can I get an official copy of a rule?
How do I get a notice of rule-making published in The New Mexico Register?
How do I publish a rule in The New Mexico Register?
What is the current rule regarding...?
What is the statute on filing interstate compacts with the SRCA?
What is the statute on filing subdivision regulations with the SRCA?
How and where do I file my publications?


Administrative Law

What is the New Mexico Register?

The New Mexico Register is the official publication for all notices of rulemaking and filings of adopted, proposed and emergency rules in New Mexico. In accordance with the State Rules Act, New Mexico state agencies must publish in the New Mexico Register all notices of rulemaking and all adopted rules, including emergency rules, filed with the Commission of Public Records - State Records Center and Archives. Agencies may publish proposed rules and other materials related to administrative law at their discretion.

How do I subscribe to the New Mexico Register?

It is available free online at www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/nmregister. Paper subscriptions are available for a fee. Subscription information can be found at: www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/nmregister/subscription.htm.

What is the New Mexico Administrative Code?

The New Mexico Administrative Code (NMAC) is a compilation of current promulgated rules arranged topically. It is available at www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/nmac.

What are the deadlines to submit material for publication in The New Mexico Register?

Submittal deadlines and publication dates can be found at www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/nmregister/schedule.htm.

Where can I get an official copy of a rule?

The New Mexico Register is the official publication for New Mexico rules. Copies can also be obtained from:

New Mexico Commission of Public Records
Administrative Law Division
1205 Camino Carlos Rey
Santa Fe, NM 87507

How do I get a notice of rulemaking published in the New Mexico Register?

Notices of rulemaking must be submitted to the State Records Center and Archives, Administrative Law Division by the deadline dates specified at www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/nmregister/schedule.htm.

How do I publish a rule in the New Mexico Register?

Rules must be formally filed with the Administrative Law Division before they are published in the New Mexico Register. Training is conducted by the Administrative Law Division that further explains the rule filing process. For more information contact the State Rules Division at (505) 476-7907.

What is the current rule regarding...?

To view the current rule on any topic, see the New Mexico Administrative Code (NMAC). The code is updated at least once a month. For more information contact:

New Mexico Commission of Public Records
Administrative Law Division
1205 Camino Carlos Rey
Santa Fe, NM 87507
Phone: (505) 476-7907
Fax: (505) 476-7910 staterules@state.nm.us

What is the statute on filing interstate compacts with the SRCA?

The requirement for the filing interstate compacts is found in the State Rules Act at Section 14-3-20 NMSA 1978. The statute provides that

A. Each agency of this state and each political subdivision of the state entering into or administering an interstate compact or other intergovernmental agreement between or among states, subdivisions of this state and other states or between this state or any subdivision and the federal government, having the force of law and to which this state or any subdivision is a party, shall file with the records center:

(1) a certified copy of the compact or agreement;

(2) a listing of all other jurisdictions party to the compact or agreement and the date on which each jurisdiction entered into participation;

(3) the status of each compact or agreement with respect to withdrawals of participating jurisdictions;

(4) citations to any act or resolution of the congress of the United States consenting to the compact or agreement; and

(5) any amendment, supplementary agreement or administrative rule or regulation having the force of law and implementing or modifying the compact or agreement.

B. The records center shall index these documents and make them available for inspection upon request of any person during normal business hours.

C. The provisions of this section are in addition to other requirements of law for filing, publication or distribution.

D. No compact or agreement entered into after the effective date of this section shall become effective until filed as required in this section.

E. The executive official in charge of any state agency or political subdivision which fails to file any compact or agreement required by this section to be filed is guilty of a misdemeanor.

What is the statute on filing subdivision regulations with the SRCA?

The requirement for the filing of county subdivision regulations is found in the New Mexico Subdivision Act at Section 47-6-10 NMSA 1978. The statute provides that a regulation, amendment or repeal is not effective until thirty days after it is filed with the county clerk and the state records administrator.

How and where do I file my publications?

You must deliver 30 copies of your publication to the New Mexico State Library. For more information see 1.25.10 NMAC, Publications: Filing, Distribution, Format & Style Requirements . For a list of state publications visit the New Mexico State Library's Computer Catalog.

 

 
 
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